David M. Marks

 

Since 1994, David M. Marks has served as the Trustee of the Irrevocable Children’s Trust, Irrevocable Children’s Trust No.2 and Phoenix Business Trust where he oversees all trust investments, with responsibilities that begin pre-acquisition and extend through ownership and disposition. Mr. Marks has played a key role in all acquisitions and management of the Trusts’ portfolio of commercial real estate and operating companies and acts as key officer, director or manager for the Trusts’ operating subsidiaries.

Mr. Marks began his real estate career in the late 1980s while still an undergraduate, completing acquisition underwriting, portfolio analysis and abstracting complex anchor tenant leases on a national basis. In the early 1990s, Mr. Marks worked on national acquisitions, underwritings and financings, highlighted by assisting in the creation Wall Street’s first single-tenant, retail property-backed securitized financing, a CMBS transaction secured by a national portfolio of 43 Kmart retail and warehouse stores.

Mr. Marks has led or participated in real estate acquisitions, refinancings and dispositions ranging in size from single asset transactions under $1 million to portfolio transactions in excess of $170 million.

Mr. Marks and his wife Rachael are active supporters of various charitable organizations, with a specific focus on Jewish charities in Southeastern Wisconsin.

Mr. Marks received a B.S. in economics from the University of Wisconsin.

Roadblocks Continue to Inhibit New Industrial Real Estate Supply

While there is no shortage of demand for industrial real estate in the United States, supply won’t catch up with that demand any time soon. Though COVID-19 fueled a massive shift toward e-commerce, shoppers are expected to keep buying online once the pandemic subsides. Meanwhile, companies have implemented plans to regionalize supply chains and reshore manufacturing assets to the United States. Other growth drivers for industrial real estate include a rising need for cold storage due to vaccine storage and online grocery fulfillment and a growing need for data centers to support the expanded use ... Read More

Online Grocery Popularity Presents Ongoing Supply Chain Challenges

Most grocery sellers found themselves ill-prepared for the dramatic shift to online shopping that occurred due to the COVID-19 pandemic, and these businesses have spent the last year and a half struggling to implement affordable and effective omnichannel fulfillment capabilities. Before 2020, grocery delivery was primarily a luxury found in large metropolitan areas, and only about 4% of grocery shopping happened online. Now, online grocery is expected to double its market share by 2025. With online grocery shopping here to stay, grocery retailers now ... Read More

The Industrial Real Estate Boom Isn’t Going Anywhere

While other commercial real estate (CRE) sectors struggled during the COVID-19 pandemic, industrial real estate barely stumbled at all. As shoppers shifted their purchases online to avoid crowded stores, the ensuing eCommerce boom created a spike in demand for distribution centers and warehouses that continues today, more than a year and a half later. In addition, online grocery purchases and vaccine development initiatives created a rush on cold storage, an oft-neglected subsector of industrial real estate. Companies seeking to shorten their supply chains through ... Read More

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